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for watching. we appreciate your ♪ >>> this is "world news." tonight nelson mandela, his struggle and strength healed a nation and changed a world. >> i stand here before you not as a prophet but as a humble servant. >> from a tiny prison cell, he rallied millions against racism and injustice. his long walk to freedom a beacon of hope for generations. >> nothing will stop our date with destiny. >> tonight, the world mourns the passing of an icon. >>> and a good evening to al you. we welcome you to a special edition of "world news," beginning with breaking news. a titan of the century has died. nelson mandela, the man who taught the modern world you can transform anger into hope. he was 95 and it's not that his death was a surprise but his life continues to astonish us in a master class in living the possibility of a better world. he spent 27 years in prison for his belief in freedom, equality and emerged with a message of generosity toward his oppressors. we have reaction from around the world tonight. first "good morning america" anger robin roberts who has traveled to south afri
>>> i cherish the idea. so help me god. >> remembering nelson mandela. the anti-apartheid activist and south african former president dies at 95. this morning he's being remembered as an icon of human rights. >> he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. captioning funded by cbs >>> this is the "cbs morning news" for friday, december 6th, 2013. good morning. good to be with you. i'm anne-marie green. well, this morning nelson mandela is being remembered for his resolve and ability to forgive, traits that helped peacefully end the brutal segregationist policy in his native south africa. south africa's first black president died yesterday at the age of 95 following a long illness. he was surrounded by his family. mandela's fight against apartheid made him an inspiration to millions, including president obama. >> i would study his words and his writings. the day he was released from prison, he gave me a sense of what human beings can do when they're guided by their hopes and not by their fears. >> when mandela died, crowds gathered throughout south africa to mourn his death a
of the greatest men of our time is dead tonight. nelson mandela passing away today at the age of 95. shortly after his death, south african president jacob zuma addressed the nation. >> fellow south africans, our beloved nelson mandela, the founding president of our democratic nation has departed. our nation has lost its greatest son. our people have lost a father. >> south africa and the world in mourning at this moment. world leaders expressing their condolences. president obama addressed us earlier this evening. >> he achieved more than could be expected of any man. and today he's gone home. and we've lost one of the most influential, courageous, and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. i am one of the countless millions who drew inspiration from nelson mandela's life. my very first political action, the first thing i ever did that involved an issue or a policy or politics was a protest against aparthe apartheid. i would study his words and his writings. the day he was released from prison gave me a sense of what human beings can do when they're guided
of nelson mandela brings a sense of loss around the world as people paid tribute outside his home in johannesburg. crowds take to the streets in so weto to remember their former leader. example nelson mandela has left for the rest of us to follow. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. since last night when the world learned of the death of former south african leader nelson mandela, the tributes have been flooding in. we learned from president jacob zuma that mandela will be given a full state funeral on sunday, december 15. the white house has confirmed president obama and the first lady will travel to south africa next week to take part in memorial services. we will have full coverage and area begin in johannesburg -- johannesburg. >> they come from all walks of life and all communities to pay respects outside the home of nelson mandela. the sense of bereavement is palpable. to some, almost private and personal. together,so a coming a nation united in mourning but also in celebration of the life of the man they call madiba. >> people are ce
>> announcer: the >>> the death of nelson >>> the death of nelson mandela. this is nbc nightly news with brian williams. we're back with more of our special coverage of the passing of nelson mandela who died today at the age of 95. as you might imagine, at this hour, reaction to his loss, is pouring in from around the world and the nation of south africa now begins a state of mourning. our south african-based correspondent is with us from outside the mandela family home in johannesburg. as we said in our first half hour, this is a nation many of whom went to bed last night who will be waking up tomorrow morning to hear this anticipated but still sad and shocking news. >> absolutely right, brian. anticipated. expected. predictable but painful nonetheless. as i look around, the crowds here have grown to maybe 400 or 500 people. mainly south africans who were born after the birth of democracy. the so-called born frees who have no memory of the darkest years of ar par tide. they are singing and celebrating his life rather than mourning his death because, of course, his death was not in
: late today we learned of the death of nelson mandela, the man who lead south africa from apartheid to a multiracial democracy. >> he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. >> pelley: from johannesburg. an american is gunned down in benghazi, libya. was it terrorism, bob orr is covering. snow, ice and bitter cold stretch across half the nation. manual bojorquez on what it is hitting and where it is going. and the special bond between two presidents. we'll talk to bill clinton about his friend nelson mandela. >> we could have had the politics of resentment. he chose the politics of inclusion. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening. he changed the world. you can't say that about many people. but you can say that about nelson mandela. the man who lead south africa's peaceful transition out of apartheid and became the country's first black president. he died today at the age of 95. mandela had been battling a lung infection for many months. right after its official announcement tonight mourners began gathering at m
, including many women and irn ch. in the end, it killed 69 people. at the time nelson mandela was in his early 40s. he had joined the african national congress, the anc, way back in 1944. the anc opposing apartheid had been organized as non-violent resistance. but after sharpville, they decided maybe that wasn't enough. after sharpville they decided they would form a paramilitary wing and nelson man delg la was one of the anc leaders who went undergroutd to help it. they would target infrastructure and try to sabotage the state. after sharpville the government of south africa started mass arrests of anc leaders and other activists. they banned the a nchnc. they made it illegal to be a part of that group. nelson mandela was arrested in 1961, again in 1962 and convicted of traveling illegally. they sentenced him to five years hard labor on robben island. while he was already serving that sentence they put him on trial again, this time for sabotage. and they convicted him, and they sentenced him to life in prison, to life on robben island. so in 1964 he began a new sentence that was a life
there is true freedom in forgiveness. >> we'll look at mandela's life, his policy, and how he handled criticism. it's all part of his enduring legacy. my guest, tom brokaw, civil rights leader reverend jesse jackson. and harry smith talks to poet maya angelou as she mourns a good friend. >> and that's what he brought, was deliverance and ignorance. >> i'll have all that ahead on "meet the press," sunday, december 8. >>> the world's longest running television program, this is "meet the press." >>> and good sunday morning. it is a day of prayer and reflection in south africa as the nation mourns its former president, nelson mandela. flags are also at half staff at the white house this morning. president obama and the first lady will be going to south africa on tuesday. and former presidents jimmy carter and bill clinton will also be going to south africa this week. nelson mandela will be laid to rest this week. charlene hunter-gault who worked for npr during nelson mandela's presidency, and from new york, special correspondent tom brokaw. here is tom back in 1990 interviewing nelson mandela after
>> pelley: tonight, celebrating mandela. south africans pay tribute to the father of their country as the government announces plans for his services. a delegation of u.s. presidents will attend. reports from deborah patta, mark phillips, and michelle miller. anthony mason on the best jobs report since the great recession. but what kind of jobs is the economy creating? an ice storm causes havoc in the middle of the country. manuel bojorquez is there. and allen pizzey on the years that made the man. >> for 18 of the 27 years he spent in prison, nelson mandela walked down this corridor everyday and at the end of that walk there was no freedom, there was this. >> reporter: with bob simon on the moment he was free. >> after 27 years, his head was high and his fist was clenched. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening. the south african government announced today that the state funeral for former president nelson mandela will be a week from sunday-- the culmination of days of memorial services. president obama will lead the u
. >> nelson mandela, speaking after his release from 27 years in prison in south africa. his conviction, his courage changed the world. mr. mandela went from freedom fighter to political prisoner to president. >> his message of reconciliat n reconciliation, not vengeance, inspired people everywhere after he negotiated a peaceful end to the brutal segregation of black south africans and forgiveness for what the white government had done, oppressed them and imprisoned him. today, the world is remembering ali con. >> nelson mandela. nelson mandela. ♪ >> in south africa, the grieving and mourning are mixed with songs and celebration. for the man affectionately known by his clan name madibmadiba. remembering the life and legacy of any son mandela. i'm suzanne malveaux. >> i'm michael holmes. thanks for your company. it is interesting how much of a celebration it has been. there is the mourning. there were tears tonight. today it's been singing and dancing, people celebrating the life. >> he seems to have an impact on just about everyone. people around the world are reacting. we are watching li
mandela, the anti-apartheid leader and first black president of south africa. >>> rival forces continue to clash in the central african republic. at least 100 people are reported dead. >>> and in a remote area of northeastern japan, a group of architects has been working not just to rebuild houses but to revive shattered communities. >>> millions of people around the world are remembering and paying tribute to the man who is considered the father of modern south africa, nelson mandela has died. he was 95, known respectfully as madiba by south africans, he dedicated his life to the fight against apartheid and went on to become the country's first black president. nhk world's chie yanagichi reports. >> reporter: the news was shocking but not unexpected. >> fellow south africans, our beloved nelson mandela, the founding president of our democratic nation, has departed. >> reporter: minutes after president jacob zuma announced mandela's death, south africans started to mourn and remember. >> so painful. i just can't believe it. >> we cry with the family and the nation, we have a great loss.
you, thank you. thank you. me, thank you,h thank you, thank you, the first lady telling nelson mandela shortly after she became first lady here in america. i want to bring in our chief correspondent. this is very much a global headline with nelson mandela. mano question, this is a who has jacob zuma, the president of south africa, said the founder of the democratic republic of south africa. it was nelson mandela who created that democracy. that is the miracle that astonished the world and made him such a world figure. he was well known while he was in prison, but when he came out of prison, there was a great question about what would happen. would there be a terrible bloodbath, with they get through the passage to democracy with apartheid? it was because of nelson mandela and his character that they did. the world recognized a peacemaker, and he developed a moral stature in the world that helped him bring south africa into the world community, help them reintegrate into the world terrible it aow role in various hot spots the world. he was very close to president bill clinton. frankly,
. ♪ >>> and this morning, the world celebrates the life of nelson mandela. >> we have never doubted in our mind, even during the darkest hours of our struggle, that eventually we would win. >> he calls himself an ordinary man who became a leader because of extraordinary circumstances. >> sometimes it's calls for a nation to be great. let your greatness blossom. >> this morning, his life, his legacy. >> as long as injustice exists in our world, none of us can truly rest. >> we talk to the people whose lives he touched. this is a special edition of "good morning america," remembering nelson mandela, a man who changed the world. >>> we do say good morning, everyone. and we are celebrating the life of one of the most remarkable men in history. he has been called the apostle of reconciliation. a leader who inspired so many, with his own fight for freedom and justice for all. we have so many pictures that we're going to share with you. this, outside of his home in south africa. crowds gathering all around the world. tributes pouring in from around the globe this morning. >> 95 years old. a monumental life.
is headed east. >> south africa will honor nelson mandela with more than a week of memorial events. he died at the age of 95. his countrymen are grieving, but many are using his passing to celebrate a life well lived. we have the story now from johannesburg. >> reporter: it's the night of chanting for the man who they call father. father of the nation being celebrated for incredible grace, the man who transcended class and race. for south africans the day is for morning. mandiba, he was the father of the nation is it. >> they would come together and mourn. >> he might have been sicked for a long time, but people here are shot. they're mourning for their leader. >> we knew that this would come because of mandiba's age there is a huge sense of loss you. >> young and old, white and black, remembered his grace, his generosity of spirit. >> i'm just glad he did all he did for us. hopefully we continue the legacy he left. >> reporter: a legacy of forgiveness and reconciliation that this country is deeply missing. over the next ten days mandela's body will lie instate. mandela always said that a m
today. >>> good morning. i'm chris jansing. this morning we remember nelson mandela. in life he united south africa and the world and his legacy as a fighter for freedom will continue to resonate well after his death. icon, legend, hero. none of those words seem quite big enough to describe a man who changed the world. ♪ and yet in the streets of johannesburg, the crowds are celebratory. south africa planning ten days of mourning. mandela's body will lie in state with leaders from all over the world expected to pay respects. here in the united states, flags are flying at half staff. mandela had a huge impact on president obama inspiring him to public service. the two only met once in 2005 when president obama was then senator obama. >> i am one of the countless millions who drew inspiration from nelson mandela's life. my very first political action, the first thing i ever did that involved an issue or policy or politics was a protest against apartheid. >> mandela spent 27 years behind bars for treason, for backing an anti-apartheid charter. he was finally released february 11, 1990.
mandela. the man that shaiferre shared t. >>> the exquisite taste. i had the privilege to cook mr. mande mandela's first meal f captivity. ♪ >>> googood evening and thank yu for joining us i'm expwroz. joie chen. >>> but it was also designed to send a message t that the nation was serious about it's war on drugs. in the year since ho how howevey have come together to criticize the guidelines which limit judges gues discretion in handit sensentences. >> prosecutors can strong arm defendants into plea deals. a young man received a sentence that eastern even a judge call. >> 23 years eatio ago weldon waa father of two bhoi bhois boys aa budding record label. >> he was a total joke jokester. >> this is weldon's sister. inafge left he was also a smalle marijuana dealer. trans actions that let him down to this place the fed penitentiary where he has been incarcerated for a debl decade w rchl. >> while we talkin angela called for prison and talked about what led him there. i was young and dumb and it was a big mistake. >> a mistake that owe i e he isg dearly for. >> one of my childhood frien
spent in prison, nelson mandela walked down this corridor everyday and at the end of that walk there was no freedom, there was this. >> reporter: with bob simon on the moment he was free. >> after 27 years, his head was high and his fist was clenched. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening, the south african government announced plans today for a week of memorial services for nelson mandela, culminating with his funeral a week from sunday. president obama will lead a u.s. delegation, expected to include a number of former presidents, though it is not known which of the services he will attend. mourners continued to gather today at mandela's home in johannesburg where he died last night and at his former home in soweto. perhaps no one image summed up his legacy better than this. >> blacks and whites signed by side honoring the father of a multiracial south africa, a man who became a worldwide symbol for racial equality. >> debra patta is there. dance today. from the sprawling township of soweto to the plush upmarket
our continuing coverage on the passing of nelson mandela. reverend? >> thank you, ed. and tonight, grief in south africa and america and around the world. for nelson mandela. one of the towering figures of this century and the last one. an inspiration for billions of people across the globe has passed away at the age of 95. tributes are pouring in from across the globe for this freedom fighter. this man of peace who helped free south africa from apartheid and inspired citizens of all nations. president obama spoke just moments ago. >> he achieved more than could be expected of any man. and today he's gone home. we've lost one of the most influential, courageous, and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. for now let us pause and give thanks for the fact that nelson mandela lived. a man who took history in his hands and bent the arc of the moral universe towards justice. may god bless his memory and keep him in peace. >> mandela spent nearly a third of his life as a prisoner of apartheid, b
>> schieffer: today on "face the nation," the world remembers nelson mandela. thousands are turning out in his country as south africa holds a national day of prayer to honor the man they call mondiva the father of modern south africa. we'll talk to friends and followers of the former president who died last week at the age of 95. that and the other news of the day on "face the nation." >> schieffer: good morning again, the storm that left parts of the south and midwest in an icy deep freeze is now moved east, it's expected to hit virginia and mid atlantic states today then move up the east coast towards boston and new york. we begin this morning in south africa where debra begins our coverage of the day of national prayer for nelson mandela. >> good morning, bob. well this being a multi-faced country we saw many church services around the country today part of the national day of prayer and reflection nor nelson mandela. in the very famous regina muda during the anti-apartheid struggle a large service there this morning, the guiding light of this country. also prayer s
of nelson mandela. former secretaries of state colin powell and james baker share their memories with us. plus, rock star bono on his friend's wisdom and courage. >>> relentless cold batters much of the country. the ice storm threatens to disrupt the lives of millions. >>> and one of the last survivors of what could be the most important treasure hunt history. >>> but today, your world in 90 seconds. >> for me, he had hope, he represented freedom. so, today, i'm here to show i'm thankful for him! the world mourns the passing of an icon. >> nelson mandela died at his home surrounded by his family. >> went from the prison cell to the presidency with such unmatched grace. >> i think we try to prepare ourselves, but emotionally, it's not that easy. >> crowds gathering outside the home in johannesburg. ♪ >> he was a father figure to the nation. the one thing we all had in common. >> justice for all, let freedom ring. god bless. >> millions of americans are facing another big blast of winter weather. >>> the november jobs report. 203,000 jobs added in november. the jobless rate fell to 7%. >
of a global icon as news spreads of nelson mandela's death. >> we've lost one of the most influential, courageous and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. >> this morning we'll take you to south africa and look at the man who spent so much of his life behind bars, yet his words and actions continue to have a profound impact around the world. >>> and in other news, much of the u.s. braces for a major winter storm with snow, ice and plunging temperatures cutting across the country. >>> good morning. i'm ma ra schiavocampo. he's remembered as a man that changed the world. nelson mandela being mourned around the globe today. from a small prison cell, he rallied a nation. his long walk to freedom inspired hope in millions and his humility helped to revolutionize south africa. >> his tireless struggle for freedom earned him the respect of the world. >> his journey from a prisoner to a president embodied the promise that human beings and countries can change for the better. >> we should have the sa
finnegan, with our continuing coverage of the life and death of nelson mandela. [ singing ] >> south africans remember the man who lead them out of white-only rule. [ gunfire ] >>> in other news, france deploys more troops to the central african republic, a day after violence lead more than a hundred people dead. >>> and a cash for work scheme is winning praise for helping in the cleanup after typhoon haiyan. ♪ >>> so we begin with the death of nelson mandela. tributes are being paid and prayers today for the icon. the country's first black president died at his home on thursday at the age of 95. the president of south africa addressed the country to reveal further detiles of funeral arrangements. the south african government declared this sunday as a national day of prayer and reflection, and from december 11th, mandela's body will lie in state at key government buildings in the capital of victoria. then on sunday december 15th, he'll be laid to rest in a private ceremony. >> this international icon was a symbol of reconciliation, unity, love, human rights and justice in our count
. thank you for watching our special situation room coverage of the passing of nelson mandela. much more coming up right now on erin burnett "outfront" with jake tapper filling in. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> good evening. you're watching erin burnett "outfront." we're following the news story of nelson mandela, the first black president of south africa. an anti-apartheid icon. he was 95 years old. his passing was announced late this afternoon by south african president jacob zuma. >> our nation has lost its greatest son. our people have lost a father. but though we knew that this day would come, nothing can diminish our sense of the profound and enduring loss. >> president obama who met mandela in 2005 said he cannot fully imagine his own life without the example set by mandela. >> we will not likely see the likes of nelson mandela again. so it falls to us as best we can to follow the example that he set to make decisions guided not by hate but by love. to never disdown the difference that one person can make. to strive for a future that is worthy of his sacrifice. for now
to the ages. >> what made nelson mandela great was precisely what made him human. we saw in him what we seek. >> good evening from washington. in its own way is in a state of mourning tonight. nelson mandela was historic figure, inspiration and role model for africans, south africans, but americans as well in our own troubles racial history and struggle to overcome that mirrored to americans in the life and the struggle and the suffering and then the triumph and the leadership of nelson mandela whose passing at 95 was noted by his successor, south african president, jacob zuma. >> yet, what made nelson mandela great was precisely what made him human. we saw in him what we seek in ourselves. and in him, we saw so much of ourselves. >> reporter: one of those who says he was especially inspired is american president, barack obama, who shared his reaction a few moments ago to the passing of south africa's first black president. >> i would study his words and his writings. the day he was released from prison, gave me a sense of what human beings can do when guided by hopes and not fears. like so
run down. we will honor and remember the life of former south african president, nelson mandela. his death was not a surprise. he was in failing health for months since being admitted to the hospital six months ago. he is being laid to rest a week from sunday and today people are remembering him as a giant among men. one of the greatest heroes. he was a man in the mold of gandhi and martin luther king. a revolutionary who spent nearly a third of his life behind bars so his country would be free. flags have been lowered to half-staff in washington and all over the country. reaction has poured in from all corners from global leaders to activists to ordinary men and women remembering nelson mandela. >> our nation has lot of its greatest son. our people have lot of a father. >> let us pause and give thanks to the fact that nelson mandela lived. a man who took history in his hands and bent the ark of the moral universe towards justice. >> thank you for the gift. >> what an extroerdary and inspiring man else in an mandela was. >> going from being in prison on the list of many nations and b
by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> thanks, good evening everyone. we're devoting this hour to nelson mandela. very few people transformed their country. the crowd outside his house speak to that. ♪ ♪ >> sad news, there is a sense of celebration how far nelson mandela brought south africa and brought us all and opened our eyes to better angels to justice over injustice and compassion in the face of cruelty and sometimes in an unforgiving world to forgiveness. >> this is the moment of our deepest sorrow. our nation has lost his greatest son, yet, what made nelson mandela great was precisely what made him human. we saw in him what we seek in ourselves. >> south africa's president announcing the death a short time later, president obama paid a deeply personal tribute. >> we've lost one of the most influential, courageous and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. through his fierce dignity and unbending will to sacrifice his own freedom for the freedom of others, he transformed south africa and moved
mandela passed on. he was 95 and he had been in ill health for some months now. >> the country's current president jacob zuma made the sad announcement a little over an hour ago. >> south africans, nelson mandela, the founding president of our democratic nation has departed. this is the moment of our deepest sorrow. our nation has lost its greatest son. >> a short time ago president obama had this to say about nelson mandela from the white house. >> his journey from a prisoner to a president embodied the promise that human beings and countries can change for the better. his commitment to transfer power and reconcile with those who jailed him set an example that all humanity should aspire to, whether in the lives of nations or our own personal lives. the fact that he did it all with grace and with humor and an ability to acknowledge his own imperfections only makes the man that much more remarkable. >> the president went on to say he didn't think it was likely we'd see mandela's like again. joining us now via telephone is former d.c. mayor, current council member marion barry who was i th
, nelson mandela. he died today at his home after a long illness. he was 95. good evening, i'm elizabeth cook. >> and i'm ken bastida. the crowd is still outside nelson mandela's house. this video was taken a few minutes ago. people have been chanting, singing, and dancing all through the night. it has not stopped. it was mandela who transformed the country into what it is today. martin luther king, jr., had a dream. some say nelson mandela dreamed it. he became one of the greatest civil rights icons of the last 50 years and it cost him almost three decades of his life in a jail cell. vanita on the man who earned the admiration of millions. >> and one wonders what must be passing through mr. mandela's mind at this moment. >> after 27 years in prison, nelson mandela walked into freedom. against all odds, the leader of a rebellion became the leader of national unity. mandela's decade-long rebellion turned him into a freedom fighter, an international hero. >> i fought against white domination. i have fought for every family. >> mandela was born into a privileged family. he supported no
ten days. >> mandela will be laid to rest with a state funeral sunday, december 10th. leading up to the service, zuma declared this sunday, december 8th, a national day of prayer and reflection. there will be a massive public memorial at the soccer stadium in johannesburg that hosted the world cup. he'll lie in state for three days at pretoria city hall. flags are at half staff in the capitol and white house as well, which confirmed this morning that president obama and first lady michelle obama will participate in memorial events. the guest list for his funeral will likely include every living u.s. president able to travel along with dignitaries from around the world and celebrities across the globe today, countless newspapers paying tribute. as president obama says now belongs to the ages. >> we have lost one of the most influential, courageous, and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. >> and this morning, on the "today" show, former secretary of state colin powell who attended mandela's inauguration, shared what he meant to him. >> a
nelson mandela. >> nelson mandela closed a statement from the dock saying, "i have fought against white domination and i have fought against black domination. i have cherished the ideal of a democratic and free society in which all persons live together in harmony and with equal opportunities. it is an ideal i hope to live for and to achieve. but if need be, it is an ideal for which i am prepared to die." nelson mandela lived for that ideal and he made it real. he achieved more than could be expected of any man. and today, he has gone home. we have lost one of the most influential, courageous, and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. .e no longer belongs to us he belongs to the ages. dignity andfierce unbending will to sacrifice his own freedom for the freedom of others, he transformed south africa and moved all of us. his journey from imprisonment to a president embodied the promise that human beings and countries can change for the better. his commitment to transfer power and reconcile with those who jailed him set an example that all of huma
edition of "andrea mitchell reports," celebrating the life of nelson mandela. >> i stand here before you not as a profit but as humble servant of you, the people. >> a giant among then, activist, prisoner, leader, a president, a founding father. for the legions who revered him simple madiba. >> our nation has lost its greatest son. >> my very first political action, the first thing i ever did that involved an issue or a policy or politics was a protest against apartheid. >> by the power of his example demonstrated unequivocally how each of us can choorse, how we will respond injustices, grievances, sorrows and tragedies that afflict all of human kind. >> he was an inspiration to generations of freedom fighters. >> we said if nelson mandela can do it, we can do it. we identify with the struggle. when i met him for the first time, he said to me, john lewis, i know all about you. i follow you. you inspired us. i said new york city, mr. mandela, you inspired us. >> we entered into a covenant, which i billed to society in which all, both black and white, will be able to walk tall w
the world. from johannesburg to the bay area, an outpouring of love and admiration for nelson mandela. live pictures from johannesburg, south africa,y it's friday morning. a new day for this proud and historic african nation. a steady stream of mourners and flowers have been singing and gathering throughout the night. good evening. thanks for joining us. it's a rare moment of worldwide unity tonight. nelson mandela has died. has rekindled the hope of a generation. cheryl hurd was here during mandela's visit in 1990. jean elle has the impact in the world of education and sports. we begin with the worldwide tribute happening as we speak. as dawn broke, the celebration in south africa continues, the nation lovingly remembering the man. president obama said mandela's journey from prisoner to president, taught him the power of hope. >> we've lost one of the most influential, courageous and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. >> reporter: mandela was born in south africa's black elite. but he led the movement against apartheid and was thrown in jail. to
tensions on the nation. n'beating in the major winter storm. >> remebering nelson mandela today marks the beginning of a week of commemoration. south afte afterallan how are pg nelson mandela and his legacy. >> well rochelle they are celebrating nelson mandela with song and chanting and fraser prd laughter. it's been an open air festival all day long. earlier today we went to a huge catholic church not too far from here celebrating his 50th anniversary and celebrates the life of one of the world's great statesmen. attendance today mor more than a thousand. >> the sounds of sowest tweto an that is not just another sunday the congregation of the largeste church celebrates mandela in song and prayer. as similar services are held across south africa in a day of reflex. reflection. we gather here to thank god for his life and we thank god for the blessings that he bestowed on the life of ma d ma. madiba. >> the police were sending tear gas inside of the church to get him out. it was very bad. father sebastian show us the bullet holes from a decade ago. we could have filled them saul
. >> incredible to see. "early start" continues right now. >>> remembering nelson mandela. this morning the world remembering that man, mourning the loss of a legend. south africa's former president hailed for his courage and decency and message of equality. welcome to "early start." i'm john berman. >> i'm michaela pereira. it is 5:00 in the east. >>> nelson mandela whose unbreakable will and unsurpassed courage brought an end to an era of white domination in south africa. he is dead this morning at the age of 95. mandela was such a global icon with larger than life legend who went from a prison cell to the presidency and he did it with such unmashed grace. i want to bring in robin curnow live from johannesburg. set the scene for us today, robin. >> the announcement was made just before midnight on thursday. so many south africans didn't really know that their icon had passed on. it was only when they woke up this morning that they perhaps looked at the newspapers or heard on the radio. much of this country is quite rule countryside and they would have seen headlines like this. this one means go
>>> this sunday, nelson mandela. a special person whose world course changed world events. >> he was a president that embodied that human beings and countries can change for the better. >> his enduring power is that he showed us there is true freedom in forgiveness. >> we'll look at mandela's life, his policy, and how he handled criticism. it's all part of his enduring legacy. my guests, tom brokaw, civil rights leader reverend jesse jackson. and harry smith talks to poet maya angelou as she mourns a good friend. >> and that's what he brought, was deliverance and ignorance. >> i'll have all that ahead on "meet the press," sunday, december 8. >>> the world's longest running television program, this is "meet the press." >>> and good sunday morning. it is a day of prayer and reflection in south africa as the nation mourns its former president, nelson mandela. flags are also at half staff at the white house this morning. president obama and the first lady will be going to south africa on tuesday. and former presidents jimmy carter and bill clinton will also be going to south africa t
. we'll have special coverage of mandela's life and legacy he leaves behind including a report from south africa specelebratin the leader. >> he spent 27 years in prison. to the people of south africa what freedom means. >> from argentina to ireland to denmark, his death is front page news across the world. president obama met mandela just once but says he will forever strive to walk in his footprint. >> i am one of the countless millions who drew inspiration from nelson mandela's life. like so many around the globe, i cannot fully imagine my life without the example mandela set. and so long as i live, i will do what i can to learn from him. >> today we look not only at how mandela is being remembered but also reflect on how his life's mission will be carried forward. >> often when some great man dies, we say we have to wait the judgment of history. i don't think we have to in his case. we start with michelle kosinski. as i understand the crowd has been gathering because the news of madiba's death came so late in the day. explain how you have seen the crowd swell. >> reporter: right
york. nelson mandela was 96 years old and will live forever in the world. >> our beloved nelson mandela, the founding president of our democratic nation has departed. he passed on peacefully in the company of his family around 2050 on the 5th of december, 2013. he is now resting. he's now at peace. >> this is a fox news alert. former south african president, a hero, nelson mandela who's died at his johannes burg. his life is a remarkable inspiration to millions around the world. he spent 27 years in jail vowing to fight oppression, never giving up, never knowing he would get out of jail. when he finally did he became president of the nation that had imprisoned him vowing to love those that hated him eventually sharing the nobel peace price for the man who once was his oppressor. president barack obama spoke about mandela shortly after the world received the munews. >> he achieved more than expected from any man. he's gone home. we have lost one of the most influential, courageous, profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. he no longer belongs to us
to start on sunday. >>> tonight the world is mourning the loss of a freedom icon, nelson mandela being remembered as a leader who fought against apartheid and then went on to lead his country and inspire the world. >> president obama, first lady michelle obama, the clintons, oprah will all join world leaders for mandela's state funeral next sunday. this sunday will be a national day of prayer and reflection in south africa. tuesday will be the official public memorial. here in the u.s. the president did order flags to fly at half staff until sunday in honor of the former south african president. >>> the most visual outpouring of grief and celebration of his life is taking place outside mandela's home in a suburb of johannesburg. alphonso van marsh is there. >> reporter: people streamed down the streets toward nelson mandela's johannesburg home singing songs of praise, prayer and freedom. they gathered to pay tribute to the former south african president who died at 95 surrounded by family not far from here. this man says he's not mourning. >> i get to celebrate his life. we cry among
am prepared to die. >> nelson mandela, lived to see a free democracy in south africa. this morning, his passing at age 95 means different things to people in different generations, from starting out as a lawyer and man of action to political prisoner to symbol to historic leader, to an icon and living legend. we will not only honor mandela but put him in historical perspective on this friday edition of "way too early." goo shaqman on this december 6th. we begin with nelson mandela. it would have been ground breaking enough to become south africa's first black president, but he was so much more not only to his own country but all over the world. the long-time freedom fighter has died at the age of 95. madiba as he was known sacrificed decades of his own life in prison in an effort to win his countrymen freedom from the bonds of apartheid. mourning and tributes as you might imagine pouring in throughout the night from harlem to his hometown of johannesburg, south africa. it is all for a man who was prepared, as you heard, to die to bring democracy to a country where for so long it wa
>> we 11ed just a few hours ago that nelson mandela had passed away. the at the time is still a shock, and it is a great shock. >> thank you for having us, and i want to send out condolences on behalf of the family. where condolences to the family, and also to the people of south africa. the biggest thoughts are trucage, humility, somebody's great vision, passion, for life. and they are not saying any minute to do good. i apologize for not calling it the right time, trance africa. what was it like to meet him? >> oh, everything that was more than -- and i knew it would be anxious, and excited and dealing with -- more tremendous then i have half. a meeting with him. and just anything that is said about him, even after the meeting you just multiply it even more. the man is a great leader, but with humility, somebody who was able to bring together many many different people together. >> also being able to articulate his prince. s. his passions. but at the sate time, being able to emphasize with others. and it takes this tremendous person to do that. so everything people are sayin
for the father of a face - the latest from south africa as people celebrate the life of nelson mandela. >> it has been almost 20 years trying to bring about a global trade deal. the world trade organization has come up with an agreement said to be worth $18 trillion for the international economy. >> it is so agreed. >> the deal was made in bali and indonesia, aimed at increasing global commerce and making it easier for poorer countries to do trade. >> for the first time in our history we have truly delivered. we have achieved something significant. people all around the world will benefit from the package delivered here today. >> here is what is it could mean. it's claimed it will create 21 million jobs, 18 million in developing countries and cut red removing the need for many taxes and bribes. the w.t.o. is trying to remove all subsidies. the deal means that some developing countries can keep them in they are needed to feed the poor. the results are yet to be seen. india is happy it can keep its subsidy. >> i view this as a victory for the farmers of india, for the farmers, for subsistence farme
to nelson mandela, tonight, on "washington week." the stock market bounces back, the unemployment rate hits a five-year low, the affordable care act may be turning the corner. >> this law is working and will future.o the gwen: is it all too good to be true? >> while the white house wants to claim that healthcare.gov is now working, we know that obamacare is still plagued with problems. gwen: outside washington, detroit is headed into bankruptcy, pensions are disappearing and low wage workers say they're being left out. >> people cannot survive on $8.25 in this country. gwen: and -- we remember nelson mandela. >> there's mr. mandela, mr. nelson mandela, a free man taking his first steps into a new south africa. gwen: covering the week, jackie calmes of the "new york times," michael fletcher of "the washington post," and david wessel of "the wall street journal." >> award-winning reporting and analysis covering history as it happens. live, from our nation's capitol, this is "washington week" with gwen ifill. corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- we know inw-up, cyber world
nelson mandela, the south african freedom fighter has been canonized for his accomplishments. did you realize the u.s. had him on a terrorist watch list until 2008? >>> good afternoon. welcome to "the lead." we begin with the national lead. it's like most of the country is living inside a flu medicine commercial right now. brutally cold weather has descended upon most of the nation, bringing a deadly ice storm sweeping from texas to new york. nearly 2,000 flights have been canceled, many of them going to or from the dallas-ft. worth airport. it's colder in dallas right now than it is in anchorage, alaska. authorities fear that no amount of shoveling or salting will make the streets safe enough for the dallas marathon or holiday parades so officials decided to cancel both of those events this weekend. at least four deaths are blamed on this massive storm. two of them in oklahoma, where the roads are like skating rinks, highway patrol officers there have responded to more than 100 weather related crashes just since yesterday morning. there are fears that this ice storm could be catastro
nelson mandela. >> here in the u.s. we're tracking a dangerous ice storm. forecasters saying it could be the worst ice storm ever for the region. people are waking up without power but millions could end up losing electricity for weeks, they fear, this as temperatures continue to plummet. >> we'll continue to what's going on but we want to react to the passing of nelson mandela. here's a live look at the crowds that have been gathered outside the late south african leader's home. they're singing, their dancing, nations, of course, showing their respect. flags around the world at the white house we'll show you, see it, half-staff. this morning, honoring the anti-apartheid leader's life and legacy. we'll follow the developments from every corner of the world. let's bring with robyn curnow. she's in johannesburg. >> the news came just before midnight south african time that nelson mandela had gone. so many south africans woke up to this stark, gut wrenching head line. this says "hamba kahle madiba." >> it was an announcement heard around the world. >> our beloved nelson mandela, the foun
. [ singing ] >> south africa begins its farewell to legendary freedom fighter nelson mandela with a day of prey and reflection. >> south korea expands its air defense zone raising tensions in asia >> and the heartland takes a hit from storms. today it's headed for the east coast [ ♪ music ] >> remembering nelson mandela. today was a day of national reflection. there was no bigger church or congregation than the people at the catholic church in south africa. [ singing ] >> the sounds of soweto, of a nation on what is not just another sunday. [ singing ] >> the congregation of the biggest catholic church in this largely christian country celebrates nelson mandela in song and prayer. similar services in all faiths are held across south africa in a day of reflection. >> we gather here to thank god for his life. we thank god for the blessing he bestowed on this world through the life of madiba. >> this church holds a special place in the history of antiapartheid movement. it was a sanctuary for protesters, sometimes violated by the police. >> so why do you think police threw tear gas insi
rest this week. charlene hunter-gault who worked for npr during nelson mandela's presidency, and from new york, special correspondent tom brokaw. here is tom back in 1990 interviewing nelson mandela after he was released from prison. it's a great photo. the reverend jesse jackson is here, one of the first people to greet mandela after he was released from prison. what a great day that was. we'll talk about it. and he wrote a book entitled "mandela's way." and charles ogletree who marched for mandela's freedom and subsequently met with him several times. welcome to all of you. it's a great privilege to have this conversation. i want to begin in south africa with charlene hunter-gault and have her set the scene with this national period of mourning and reflection and celebration. good morning, charlene. >> reporter: right now, david, it is pouring down rain, and in south africa rain is a sign of good for tutune, so maybe it is honor of mandela. up until this moment, people have been dancing in the streets, they've been singing songs, they've been recalling aspects of nelson ma
mandela, a special "meet the press" a special in-depth look at a world leader whose course and determination changed the course of world events. >> his journey from a prison to a president embodied the promise that human beings and countries can change for the better. >> his enduring power is that he showed us that there is true freedom and forgiveness. >> a look at mandela's life, his effect on u.s. politics and policy and how he handled controversy and criticism, all part of his enduring legacy. among my guests today, my colleague nbc news special correspondent tom brokaw, civil rights leader, the reverend jesse jackson and nbc news correspondent harry smith talks to author and poet maya angelou as she mourns a good friend. >> that's what he's brought, deliverance from ignorance. >> i'm david gregory. all of that ahead on "meet the press" from new york this morning, sunday, december 8th. . >> i'll have all that ahead on "meet the press," sunday, december 8. >>> the world's longest running television program, this is "meet the press." >>> and good sunday morning. it is a d
for this special edition of "cnn newsroom" as we remember the life and legacy of nelson mandela. first breaking news in the last hour, brand new jobs report is out with the lowest unemployment rate in five years. we'll tell you how the markets and the white house are responding this morning. >>> also an arctic blast, this is dallas, where the mercury has dropped 50 degrees in just the last 24 hours. colossal ice storm putting on the freeze from texas to tennessee. and in johannesburg, remembering the man who went from prisoner to president, we'll have the latest on funeral plans for the anti-apartheid icon, nelson mandela. >>> first to that breaking news on the economy, americans are getting back to work, 203,000 jobs were added to payrolls in november, and the unemployment rate ticked two notches lower to 7%. that's the lowest unemployment rate in five years. our chief business correspondent christine romans is here to break down the numbers. better than expected, so should we feel absolutely completely good about this? >> i saw some broad-based strength in these numbers from warehousing to re
their own sort of memories of nelson mandela. we'll have more on this on "morning joe" which starts right now. ♪ ordinary love >> i build a society in which all both black and white can walk tall without any fear in their hearts. assured of their right to human dignity, a rainbow nation at peace with itself and the world. >> it would have been groundbreaking enough to become south africa's first black president, but nelson mandela was so much more. not only to his own country but to people the world over. the freedom fighter has died at the age of 95. madiba, as he was known, sacrificed 25 years of his life in prison so that his countrymen might be free from the bonds of apartheid. >> your tireless and heroic sacrifices have made it possible for me to be here today. i, therefore, place in the remaining years of my life in your hands. >> when he was released from prison he was greeted by a crowd black and white and his plight inspired a young college student who would change history himself. >> i'm one of the countless millions who drew inspiration from nelson mandela's life. my very fir
'm fareed ka czzaczar ya comin you live from new york. we'll start today's show with nelson mandela and we will ask what happened to his legacy in africa and beyond? i have a great panel including one of mandela's close kf dants. >>> then the man who until this summer was president obama's top adviser on national security, tom donnelly, on the iran deal and on why he says the u.s. doesn't need to cut a deal with hamid karzai of afghanistan. >>> next, how to understand the booming american economy. i'll ask the man who presided over great growth and some critics charge also helped create many bubbles. former fed chair alan greenspan. and as we approach the first anniversary of the newtown massacre, what can the u.s. learn from other nations about gun policy? i'll take you to japan for a fascinating look at a nation that loves violent video games but has a gun death rate that is very different from america's. it's a preview of a "gps" special airing tonight at 7:00 p.m. eastern. >>> but first, here is my take. when nelson mandela was released from prison in 1990, i remember being struck by h
of the day. we'll talk about that coming up. >>> now getting back to the life of nelson mandela, south africa's president announced that news just a few hours ago. >> it comes following mandela's long battle with lung problems that have plagued him for months now. danielle nottingham has the story. >> reporter: former president bill clinton released a statement saying today the world has lost one of its most important leaders and one of its finest human beings. south africans gather near nelson mandela's home to remember the man that led their country into a new era. he passed away after a long illness that left him bedridden for several months. >> we saw in him what we seek in ourselves. >> reporter: mandela was born into approved family in 1918 and grew up to become a lawyer, but in the '50s and '60s he became active in the movement against apartheid in south africa. he was convicted of sabotage and conspiracy to overthrow the government and sentenced to life in prison on south africa's infamous robin island. after 27 years in prison mandela was freed. >> i cherish the idea of a new south
. outside his home in south africa. a spontaneous tribute to nelson mandela, how he changed that country and beyond. a step in the right direction for the u.s. economy, a new report reveals the job picture is rienthing and unmroement is falling. a severe wind and ice storm is moving east. hundreds of thousands are without power, and travel problems are building. ♪ >>> in south africa and around the world people are k looking at the legacy of nelson mandela. meanwhile funeral plans are ama and the first lady will be there to pay their respects. here are some of the details of what is to come. on tuesday decemb10th an official public memorial will be held in johannesberg. his body will lay in state for three days. the memorial's culminate with a state funeral. finally, mandela will be buried on sunday december 15th. >> reporter: tributes are being paid and prayers made for the icon. and now the world can officially say good-bye to nelsonela on december 10th which will be the official memorial service. and then for the following three days his remains will lay in state. but before then so
-- nelson mandela. he was 95. lost itstion has greatest son. our people have lost a father. although we knew that this day diminishe, nothing can our sense of the profound and .nduring loss >> of mandela served for five years as the first black resident of south africa after the african national congress artie help end apartheid in 1994. guy johnson has more on the mandela legacy. firstree man takes his steps into a new south africa. >> from prisoner to president, his 1990 release from jail signaling the end of the racist policy of apartheid. he would go on to become the country's first truly democratically elected leader. >> i do hereby promise to be faithful to the republic of south africa. wasorn to a local chief, he one of 13 children and the first member of his family to attend school. he began opposing the white minority a policy of apartheid, laws that segregated society and made colored south africans second-class citizens. byst, mandela was moved gandhi. more aggressive, so did he. as the head of the armed wing of led ational congress, he violent sabotage attacks and was arrested an
mandela has passed away. >> it is a sad day but a day unfortunately we knew was coming as nelson mandela had been in failing health for some time and the news came from the current south african president jacob zuma who said and i quote here, "he is resting. he is now at peace. our nation has lost its greatest son. our people have lost a father." you're looking at some images of nelson mandela through the years really considered to be the father of modern south africa, a great unifier of both white and black south africans, spent 27 years as a political prisoner and in spite of that rose to become the president of the nation and as you can hear, people talk about his generous spirit. >> truly a symbol of peace and forgiveness as well. we have heard reports that he was with family and friends at his house last night when he passed away. some close family friends were also in johannesburg in south africa when he did. >> vinita nair has a look back at nelson mandela's life and legacy. >> and one wonders what must be passing through mr. mandela's mind at this moment. >> reporter: after 27 y
nelson mandela. i am mark crumpton. that is it for bottom line. have a great weekend. i will see you next time. ♪ >> from our studios in new york city, this is "charlie rose." >> we begin our coverage of the death of nelson mandela with a -- the cbs evening news. >> he was born july 18, 1918. him a namegave meaning "troublemaker," but later a school teacher in nelson. at 23.d to johannesburg he became one of the nation's first black lawyers and joined the opposition african national congress in the early 1940's, devoting himself to peacefully ending apartheid. 1960, peaceful black demonstrators were killed by white south african police in in infamous massacre. men alike came to believe the only reef force -- mandela came to believe then that the only recourse was violence. >> it is futile for us to continue talking peace and a governmentgainst whose reply is only savage attacks on an unarmed and defenseless people. >> he was arrested and sentenced to life for sabotage and conspiracy. he served most of his life on island, the alcatraz of south africa. a fellow prisoner said mandela never
of the death of nelson mandela with the cbs evening news. >> he was born july 18, 1918. his mother gave him a name meaning "troublemaker," but later a school teacher in nelson. he moved to johannesburg at 23. he became one of the nation's first black lawyers and joined the opposition african national congress in the early 1940's, devoting himself to peacefully ending apartheid. then in 1960, peaceful black demonstrators were killed by white south african police in the infamous massacre. mandela came to believe then that the only recourse was violence. >> it is futile for us to continue talking peace and nonviolence against a government whose reply is only savage attacks on an unarmed and defenseless people. >> he was arrested and sentenced to life for sabotage and conspiracy. he served most of his life on robben island, the alcatraz of south africa. a fellow prisoner said mandela never let his spirit die. >> he accepted that he may not live to see the victory. but he did not doubt that the freedom struggle would triumph. >> mandela was imprisoned for 27 years. on february 11, 1990, at the a
. >> it will have an impact. the world of course wakes up to the death of nelson mandela. >> the world is mourning and as we mourn, we are waiting to hear news about funeral arrangements. the funeral will be held in about 10 days. there is not only going to be a public memorial but a private memorial. >> of course we'll have complete coverage go and through mr. mandela's legacy throughout the program. manus, we have a lot of data. we have tensions easing a touch. we'll go through what nelson mandela gave to the world. what else are we watching today? >> >> the germans have a healthy look at inflation. next year, germany will grow by 1.7%. we go to the unemployment numbers later today. euro/dollar is declining to 1.4616 despite yesterday's e.c.b. move yesterday or lack of movement yesterday and lack of christmas party for the market remains high. the drop has stopped for now. let's put it that way. the u.k. had its longest losing streak since april. down over 2.5% this week. the dax is at a three-week low. continuing a little bit lower despite that upgrade to growth. goldman sachs and deutsche deut
are remembering nelson mandela, a man who changed this world. president obama saying just hours ago he no longer belongs to us, he belongs to the ages. at 95, his death not a surprise, but the lessons of his life still reverbrating around the globe, that long walk to freedom, brimming with humility, resilient, a determination to forgive. and there has been a huge outpouring of emotion, reaction from around the world tonight, our team there starting with abc's chief foreign correspondent terry moran who joins us right now from london. terry? >> reporter: it is a profound moment for south africa and really for the world, the marking of the passing of this remarkable man and of the end of an era in human grace and dignity. in south africa itself, in the neighborhood which was a segregated township where nelson mandela lived before he went to prison for 27 years and where he went home to. there is a combination of mourning, of sorrow and celebration and gratitude, people gathering outside of his home and dancing, celebrating the life of nelson mandela. reaction pouring in from around the world for h
and be guided by the prepared to die for >> nelson mandela's family share their grief as the world mourns. president obama and the first lady will travel to south africa for nelson mandela's memorial service next week. >> hello, welcome no al jazeera america, i'm morgan radford live from new york city. reinforcements on the town in trying to end the violence. nearly 400 people have been killed in the fighting in the past three days. france is dispatching more than 1,000 troops and the african union plans to double its forces. 10,000 have fled the capital. officials ordered everyone off the streets of bangui. for the latest on the crisis we start in bangui. a warning - you may find some of these images disturbing. >> french soldiers on food patrol in bangui. this is new to the city and welcomeded by men. they are here to reassure people enough to open up shops. at the moment there's no food or medicine. there's little the french can do about the growing sectarian violence between muslims and christians. >> translation: we muslims have been here for 200 years. they are killing us every day.
. >> south africa's parliament is paying tribute to nelson mandela as the country prepares for the arrival of world leaders were tuesday's memorial. these are the latest in a just from parliament. some 70 heads of state are expected to attend the service a stadiumo be held in in soweto. it is expected to be one of the largest gatherings of the carries in recent history. we have the latest on the ongoing prayers and tributes to nelson mandela. >> tributes continue to pour in for nelson mandela. south africans are still toiting places significant nelson mandela. the focal point is nelson mandela's home in soweto. grand parade in cape town, where nelson mandela made his first speech in 1990 as a free man when he walked out of the gates of the present. there will be a big rally in soweto in johannesburg. a number of dignitaries and eminent people along with about 95,000 south africans will pay tribute to their beloved leader. this afternoon, they will convene a special joint sitting of parliament to allow members of parliament and opposition parties to say farewell to the man who was south afr
>> nelson mandela. man whose strength healed a nation and changed the world. >> i stand here before you not as approve it but as a humble servant. >> tonight the world mourns the passing of an icon. nelson mandela dead at the age of 95. good evening i'm dan ashley. mandela lived 27 years of his life in prison for his belief in freedom and equality and he merged after all of that time with a message of generosity towards his oppress ors. karen has the story. >> out by the home where nelson mandela died they sang in memory and mourning. >> great fighter. strong man. >> south africa president delivered the long dreaded new news. >> our nation has lost its greatest son. our people have lost a father. >>reporter: president obama praised the man he culled a personal inspiration. >> we have lost one of the most influential, courageous and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth that. sense of loss ranged from royalty. >> extremely sad and tragic news. remind what an extraordinary and inspiring man nelson mandela was. >> to regular people.
>>> people celebrating the life of nelson mandela. the show of emotion on the streets of south africa is among the out pouring of reaction a day after the leader's death. we now learn about funeral services that will get the world's attention for days to come. the other big story is the weather. expect rain and falling temperatures. you see all the green on the storm team 4 radar this weekend. it could be ice and snow. good morning, everyone. welcome to news 4 midday. it's friday, december 6th, 2o 13. just this morning we learn when nelson mandela will be laid to rest. we begin coverage at the live desk. >> the state funeral will be sunday december 15th. we have live pictures from johansburg outside where mandela lived. it is 6:00 in the evening there ago when mandela died, people have been gathering from outside his home singing and praying and leaving flowers and talking about what he means to the country. we got the details on how the week will move forward in terms of celebrating mandela's life. on this coming sunday, it is a national day of prayer and remembrance in south
mandela, we're here in south africa as the country celebrates his life and prepares to say farewell. tonight, we look back at a key moment in the struggle against apartheid, and look behind one of the most famous photos of mandela, taken the day he was released from prison. >>> good evening, from soweto on the streets where so much blood was shed in a long and bitter battle against apartheid. streets tonight have been a place of celebration for the life of nelson mandela. much more on that in a few moments. >>> but our top story tonight comes from california, where an 85-year-old american man is home after a seven-week ordeal as a prisoner in north korea. the end of a tense standoff came suddenly, the north korean government saying merrill newman, a korean war vet with a heart condition was released for humanitarian reasons. nbc's mike taibbi is in palo alto with more porous. good evening. >> reporter: good evening, lester. the north korean officers say they deported merrill newman, others say he was freed after a detention that never should have happened. the ex-marine for a trip t
>> our beloved nelson mandela, president of our democratic nation has departed. >> farewell. apartheido overcame reaches the end of the journey that took them from prisoner to president. >> it is jobs day. a role data could leave the u.s. track for the best year of job growth since 2005. >> japan's prime minister calls for a summit with china to ease tensions over the islands. good morning. welcome. " live watching "the pulse from bloomberg european headquarters here in london. >> also coming up on "the pulse ," the boss of one of britain's businesses, nigel wilson joins us and about 10 minutes. get his take on everything from the u.s. jobs report to the autumn statement. the news cycle is being dominated by one thing and that is the passing of nelson mandela. south africans are mourning the death of their first black president this morning. leaders around the world pay tribute to his life. johannesburgin yesterday. .et bring in tv africa anchor clearly south africa in a state of shock this morning. we knew he was ill -- we knew he would be in intensive care and for quite so
relented and released mandela in 1990. the famous prisoner instantly became a super star who energized the people. he became the first black person to run for president. he won in a landslide. the country celebrated and so did the rest of the world. >> i should be shining his shoes. >> reporter: behind the scenes, there was trouble in his personal life, including a messy divorce with his wife winnie, who stood behind him while he was in jail. >> president obama addressed the nation this afternoon. his comments were very personal. he spoke of how mandela inspired millions of people to fight for justice and democracy, including himself. >> the day he was released from prison gave me a sense of what human beings are guided by their hopes and not by their fears. like so many around the globe, i cannot imagine my own life without the example mandela set. >> take a look at this video. it is from oakland. mandela came to the bay area and 58,000 people filled the coliseum to meet him. many recall being face to face with the man who changed the world. we have a look at nelson mandela through th
about the inspirations that were set into motion and fulfilled on so many levels by nelson mandela, and how that inspiration needs to carry on well beyond today. here's the president. >> nelson mandela lived for that ideal and made it real. he achieved more than could be expected of any man. today he has gone home. we have lost one of the most influential, courageous, and profoundly good human beings that any of us will ever share time with on this earth. he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. >> that last line there from president obama, he belongs to the ages, reminiscent of another famous quote, which was after president lincoln was declared dead, standing coming forward who reportedly said, "now he belongs to the ages." just one more sign of the significance of the passing of nelson mandela. nowhere perhaps more felt, though, then in his native south africa. president jacob zuma was the one to break the news this afternoon. let's listen in. freedom andled for healing. he had the respect of the world. his humility, his compassion, and his humanity gained him their l
african president nelson mandela from 1994. his state of the nation address the year he was elected president. the first immense critically held elections in that country. minutes, your5 reaction and thoughts on the death of nelson mandela. if you're the eastern and central time zones, -- you can reach us on twitter. #is c-hest tag -- the span chat. the white house tweeted out this comment. rest in peace, nelson mandela. that is a picture from his visit to south africa. a number of remarks and comments from other politicians and statesmen as well. former presidents. jimmy carter sending a statement that reads rosalynn and i are of nelsony the death mandela. -- that is from jimmy carter. let's go to your calls. go ahead. jacksonville florida? sonia inove on to tampa. caller: the world is saddened. we have lost an example of what a man and what a person who cares and was able to forgive. he really led by example. is, why did we leave him in prison so long, and not try to free him in the 20 years that he was in prison? to come out forgive, and not focus on that is something people shou
>>> happening now, south africa and the world prepare for the funeral of nelson mandela. we're there live with new information. >>> plus, clinton honors mandela. the former president shares very personal stories about his friend and his hero. he says the south african leader's advice helped him get through one of his darkest hours. stand by for my one-on-one interview. >>> plus, breaking news. a snow and ice emergency. a deadly winter storm is causing havoc on the roads and in the skies across america. we're tracking the danger as the deep freeze moves east and a new storm develops out west. >>> and a big jump in jobs. does president obama deserve credit for improving the u.s. economy after a surprisingly strong employment report? i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> a ten-day mourning period is under way for one of the most influential leaders of our time. we're learning more about the final tributes to nelson mandela. stand by for that, and for my special conversation with the former president, bill clinton. he reveals a time when he and the south african
>> rose: welcome to the program, tonight we remember nelson mandela, who died in south africa at age 95, joining me the former mayor of new york, david dinkins, the former editor of time magazine who wrote a biography on nelson mandela, stengel and his long time friend, jerry inzerillo. >> it was his genetic endowment what he learned in that moment of time. the great walter zulu who was really his mentor once told me a lovely story when young nelson mandela who first came to johannesburg to study law walked into zulu ice real estate office in soweto we were just trying to become a mass movement and one day a mass leader walked into my office. >> rose: also part of this program, a conversation with nelson mandela which took place here on this program in 1993. >> and the lesson is that the method of the people, the method of political method to be used, part determined by the oppressor himself, if the oppres oppressos peaceful means, we will never result to violence. it is when the oppressor in addition to repressive policies uses violence that the oppress have had no alternati
belongs to the ages. >> nelson mandela. revolutionary, president, prisoner. and prophet. >> sometimes, it falls bonn a generation to be great. let your greatness blossom. >> this morning, how he transformed our world. the lessons for our politics today. and a look back at his remarkable interview with ted koppel, just days after leaving prison. >> to spend 27 years, at the prime of your life, is a trag y tragedy. >> then -- >> we can't survive -- >> from wendy's to the white house. america debates inequality, growth, and fairness. we tackle it with two key senators, plus james carville and mary matalin join our powerhouse round table. right here, this sunday morning. >>> from abc news, "this week" with george stephanopoulos starts right now. >>> hello, again. in south africa today, preparations for the most massive memorial service in memory. pope francis, four american presidents, the dalai lama and dozens of world leaders will be there tuesday to pay tribute to a giant of our time. we'll reflect on nelson mandela this morning. first, let's go to chief foreign correspondent terry mo
begins its farewell to legendary freedom fighter nelson mandela with a day of prayer and reflection. >>> and brace yourself. scenes like this are happening across the country today. >>> increasing tensions in asia, south korea has declared an expanded air defense zone that overlaps with once announced last month by china. it includes a strategic area disputed by the two countries. al jazeera's terry faucet reports. >> it may be about lines in the air but extend over land and sea. this is what south korea called the submerged rocky reef with a scientific research station and under the very obvious de facto control. the strategic waters and rocks are claimed by beijing and seoul as part of their exclusive economic zones. now south korea has asserted its rights in the air above. >> translator: the new korean air space defense identification zone has been modified to be in line with the country's flight information region, which does not overlap with neighboring countries. this modified zone includes the air space over ioto waters. >> it's two weeks after china's surprise extension of t
, nelson mandela i hope that as many members as possible will be able to contribute. contributions will continue until 10:00 p.m.. the house will also wish to know that there will be an event to commemorate and celebrate the life and achievements of nelson mandela taking place in westminster hall on thursday the 12th of december. >> thank you, mr. speaker. >> nelson mandela was a towering figure in our lifetime. we are here to celebrate his character, his achievements, and his legacy. condolence books have been organized. tos evening we will fly south africa to attend the service and johannesburg. and his royal highness, the prince of wales, will be there for the funeral. his family, his friends, and the millions in south africa, and those around the world, our morning and today. mourning him today. though humanity bears ever upwards, away from brutality. but it is not so. progress is not just handed down. it is one through struggle -- struggle.h nelson mandela was the embodiment of that struggle. the evil ofr forget apartheid and its affect. separate buses, separate schools, and e
>> go on for the next ten days and mandela's body will lay instate. and then he will be buried. he always said that he should be buried near where he lived his life. he'll be buried where he was born 95 years ago. >> thank you. the world will mark the passing of mandela. there will be a national day of prayer and reflection to honor mandela. mourners will be have an opportunity to say goodbye, and hell lie instate in the building where he was inaugurated in 1994. then he'll be flown to his home village. mandela will be laid to rest. thousands are expected to attend the funeral. the exact details of that event have not been revealed just yet. here to talk about mandela's political legacy in 1997 proves o'malley received mandela's help to negotiate a northern ireland peace treaty in south africa, and the two had been friends for many years. professor, it's good to talk to you. thanks for your time. we're talking about th the good friday agreement of 1998, but those as you know were fraught with negotiations with a number of groups at the table, eight political parties, the british, i
or or or or the south africans are taking in a future with alex nelson mandela off the day that the country's first black president that the struggle against apartheid. normal people that the gathering of the family home in johannesburg when he died in the company of his family after a long illness he was ninety five. early this year he'd spent months in hospital with the money infection. the announcement last night was made by the current president. for those of the pickens. going out to see what he does someone do. the funding president. let him open to the nation. this deprives the pasta farm. his footy the new company or peas from elite. how tolerant. today is tuesday on the stage. hope to serve them all the lights people gathered to share the news and celebrate the life of the man who sold the end of white minority rule and symbolize reconciliation and peaceful coexistence with that at this day to day. i think the effect is pot tonight and he didn't feel well and about i keep calling it that all we could eat it with all of you know. yes it says that she gets it. i sit there if you should celeb
mandela has begun. it is well into sunday morning, yet there is still a few dye hards. to my left on the streets, it played a few part in nelson mandela's life and the life of apartheid. so many came out to honour the struggle and the lessons that he left with. >> this street hosted apartheid's bloodiest battle and thanked its famous residents for winning the fight. outside nelson mandela's house, and played protest songs. >> in a quiet corner, nelson mandela was thanked. this was a champ, he coaches kids to box because nelson mandela asked him to. nelson mandela urged him to help his community and to take his anger out on the community, not the street. >> i wouldn't be alive today. i help the children now. >> nelson mandela loved boxing. he considered it an outlet for stress and anger. >> he trained here. it's the soweto ymca today. >> today young men from soweto train in a mooederb space. when nelson mandela boxed here, it was made of concrete. >> there were hard times. >> thanks to nelson mandela, south africa's fight is kept inside of ring. >> all the fighting. >> all of this,
mandela has died at age 95. here is the president of the united states. >> at his trial in 1964, nelson mandela chose a statement from the dock saying i have fought against white domination and i have fought against black domination. i've cherished the ideal of a democratic and free society in which all persons live together in harmony and with equal opportunities. it is an ideal which i hope to live for and to achieve. but if needs be, it is an ideal for which i am prepared to die. nelson mandela lived for that ideal and he made it real. he achieved more than could be expected of any man. and today he's gone home. we've lost one of the most influential, courageous and profoundly good human being that any of us will know in the short time on this earth. he no longer belongs to us, he belongs to the ages. through his fierce dignity and unbending will to sacrifice his own freedom for the freedom of others, madiba transformed south africa and moved all of us. his journey from a prisoner to a president embodied the promise that human beings and countries can change for the better. the commi
are mourning the loss of nelson mandela. and washington dc, people gathered with candles outside the embassy where a statue of mandela stands. >> it is now morning in south africa. some people have been paying tribute outside his home since his death was announced late thursday night. others are just waking up the to the news there. mandela is credited with transforming a country. >> tonight, danielle nottingham has more on the passing of this great leader. >> reporter: south africans gathered in the predawn darkness to sing the praises of their former president, nelson mandela who died just hours earlier at the age of 95. >> our nation has lost its greatest son. our people have lost a father. >> reporter: after 27 years in prison for crimes against the government, mandela was freed in 1990. in 1994, he became the country's first black president. >> he built a genuine multiracial democracy in south africa. when he could have had a one party state and shut everyone else out. when he could have had the politics of resentment, he chose the politics of inclusion. >> reporter: years later, he bec
>>> celebrations of the life of nelson mandela continue. people around the world will say their final goodbyes coming up on december 15. thanks for joining us. i'm mike hyadek. the date was announced this morning and sunday will be a national day of prayer and reflection in honor of mandela. teara merginer has more on the flood of condolences. >> reporter: the flag is at half staff at the south african embassy in washington. outside his home in johannesburg, mourners of all races are coming together to mourn the man they call mandiba. a memorial service will be held next tuesday and the outpouring of love says something about the caliber of a man who led the country out of apartheid. >> we'll always love mandiba for teaching us it's possible, to overcome hatred and anger in order to build a new nation. >> reporter: messages of tribute are pouring in from around the world, from the dali llama in india. >>. >> sadness translates into determination. we must do so his spirit continues. >> reporter: pope francis applauded mandela for promoting human dignitiy and forging a ne
and called for the release of kenneth bay. >> now to the passing of nelson mandela. you are seeing live pictures where people from all over the world are gathering in johannesburg celebrating his life with dance, prayer and a photograph. it was a unique gift to bring people together even in death. >> nelson mandela dreamt of a rainbow nation. south africa is not present. this couple remembered the man called tata. >> to see this many people across - across borders and across races singing together and honouring an amazing man. >> we are here because of nelson mandela. we live the same life as other people. he was the greatest father in the world. >> during apartheid black south africans couldn't even walk the streets. now they come here to sing. old protest songs. [ singing ] >> they danced to songs about nelson mandela's life. he empowered them and the country to emerge from their laws. >> what have you taken from his leadership? >> unity. that's the most important thing. >> peace, reconciliation, that was the message, a message we have to teach our children and our children's children
. >>> world leaders are making their way to south africa, honoring nelson mandela. troops on the ground in the central african republic, there to stop the violence that has claimed hundreds of thousands of lives. the clock is once again ticking for congress for lawmakers it is the final week of the year. both houses in washington at the same time, and both houses facing a laundry list of things that need to be done. the biggest of course being the budget. and new spending bill would help avoid the government shutdown just like the one we went through in october. our white house correspondent mike viqueria is in washington. what happens if congress doesn't reach that end of the year deadline? >> del, there are a couple of things going on. the budget meeting they set that for december theant and you're -- 13th, you're absolutely right. the house of representatives they are here for hardly six months of the year, if you put it together that way. there are a whole list of things that need to get done if americans, particularly lower income americans aren't going to be suffering going into t
and the world is saying good-bye to nelson mandela and my conversation with maya angelou and gary player about the power to inspire people to imagine a better world and make it real. and later, you'll meet a man who spent 18 years in prison and came close to being executed for a murder he didn't commit despite evidence he didn't do it. >>> we begin tonight with breaking news of freakish and dangerous weather pattern that made it possible to experience a 105 degree swing from miami where it was 80 to montana where it was minus five. super cold rain is falling, freezing and coating a big chunk of the country in misery and y mayham. >> reporter: two days ago here in arkansas, the state was reaching near record high temperatures, 75 degrees on wednesday. today, try 26 and a dangerous layer of ice coating the roads, cars spun out and power lines weighed down with the frozen rain. >> the biggest problem we got right now, no traffic on the road. therefore no traffic when we put the salt and sand down, sleet come down and sit on top of it and sit there, and until there's really stop, i don't think w
minister david cameron and members offer their tributes to former south african president nelson mandela who died last week. after that we'll be live at the american enterprise stews for financial -- institute. they'll be meeting to discuss implementation of the dodd-frank financial regulation law. and later, the senate returns at 2 p.m. eastern for general speeches followed later with more debate on the annual legislation authorizing defense programs and debate and a roll call vote on a judicial nomination. >> representatives from iran and six world powers will meet in vienna this week for the next round of talks concerning iran's nuclear program. we'll have analysis of the ongoing negotiations at an event hosted by the center for strategic and international studies. speakers include former national security adviser brzezinski and new york times columnist tom friedman. cbs news "face the nation" anchor bob schieffer will moderate the event. that gets underway at 5:30 p.m. eastern over on c-span3. >> next, a look at the future of the republican party from political strategist and cnn con
>>> for now, let us pause and give thanks to the fact that nelson mandela lived, a man who took history in his hands and bent the bar towards justice. >>> south african president nelson mandela died at the age of 95 leaving the country in mourning. >> our nation has lost its greatest -- our people have lost a father. >> elsewhere, the fed's richard bishop blames lawmakers for holding back the recovery ahead of what is expected to be a weaker payroll number in the u.s. economy. >>> germany's central bank raises its 2014 growth target for europe's largest economy as evidence shows demand from within the eurozone is finally picking up. >>> deutsche bank is to close its commodity business mainly in london and new york. display you're watching "worldwide exchange," bringing you business news from around the globe. >> a former south african president nelson mandela passed away last night at the age of 95. world leaders have been sending message messages of mourning for the leader. >> he is now resting. he is now at peace. our nation has lost its greatest son our people have lost a fat
today at nelson mandela's long journey. good evening, i'm judy woodruff. we further explore mandela's legacy. tonight, how south africa was forever changed by the man they called "father." >> to many people nelson mandela does represent the kind of more all center an a choice to turn away from violence, to turn away from strife. and to turn away from racial divisions. >> woodruff: back in the u.s., paul solman digs into today's jobs report, which points to strong gains in hiring and a five-year low in the unemployment rate. and mark shields and david brooks are here. they reflect on mandela's life and the rest of the week's news. those are just some of the stories we're covering on tonight's "pbs newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. >> this program was made
and friends 5:00 until 9:00. thanks for joining us. we'll see you back here tomorrow night. . nelson mandela was 95. >>> fellow . >>> our beloved nelson mandela, the president of our democratic nation has departed. >> former south african president nelson mandela is dead at the age of 95. the anti-apartheid leader spent 27 years in prison, led his country to democracy and became the first black president. donald rumsfeld joins us. good evening, sir. >> good evening. >> why is it that president mandela could do something that nobody else could? what was it about him? >> he had some special qualities. he was a humble person with impressive grace, almost like royalty. he had good humor. and gentleness. but steel in his backbone and resolve and conviction. i think one thing that possibly was different about him, he had that wonderful ability to put himself in other people's shoes and try to look at tough issues from their perspectiie as well as his own. and that's an enormously valuable thing when you're wrestling with tough issues where people feel strongly. and you know, it gets to appreciate
only makes the man that much more remarkable. >> nelson mandela is dead tonight after a a long battle with lung problems. >> we have a lot to tell you about tonight, but first a warning about weather that may affect your commute. right to our chief meteorologist. >> reporter: the rain is on the way, and there's rain and showers across parts of the metro area. the heaviest activity back in the mountains. that's for us on friday, and then back into ohio valley and western kentucky and tennessee, that's snow, sleet, and freezing rain. that will be season. look at the temperatures weirdly warm out. 63 in leesburg, 62 downtown, and the midnight temperature will end up being the high for tomorrow, but i want you to dress for the 40s, because temperatures will fall all day. yellow alert. dress for the 40s. you wi be in the 40s to come home. mild start, and then a red alert on sunday with the snow and mix on the way. wakeup weather, not too bad. temperatures 55 to 60 to start, and then they will fall. the showers across the board. a wet move going to work and coming home. take a light jacket.
. >>> south african mourners are holding vigils and memorials for nelson mandela continues. and this marijuana ingredient is bringing hundreds of families with epileptic children to colorado. >> we'll start with the legacy of nelson mandela. >> part of successful white government that kept nelson mandela in jail and then served for mandela. as u.s. ambassador and then foreign minister it was his task to defend the continued imprisonment of nelson mandela and other political opponent. but privately he long lobbied for mandela's release. >> i submitted a memorandum, due to the effect that mr. mandela ought to be released that we're bringing a bigger martyr of him every day he stays in prison, and that his international aclaim and status would be growing to an extent that we would not be able to hand it will any more. unfortunately, it continued on. >> here we have a man 27 years in prison. the day he was released he displayed the acumen and attitude of an american who has been a president before. amazing. amazing what insight he had into the minds of people. and for that matter into world affair
nelson mandela and north korea. the november jobs report. margaret carlson and ramesh ponnuru debate obamacare's revival. we begin the program with the former secretary of state, dr. madeleine albright. madame secretary. >> good to be with you. >> you paid tribute to the noble statesmen, nelson mandela. you say you treasure the memory of your meetings with him. what is the most memorable? >> the most memorable was his modesty. he walked up to me and said, hello, i am nelson mandela, like you would not know. when he spoke at the general assembly session, he walked up slowly to that podium and he would take out his glasses and he would clean them and then he would put them on, then he would speak with a great cadence. i also visited him. as a human being, he was stunning. the more you knew the history of a man that had spent so much time in prison. for me, the most important thing about him was his forgiveness. >> no bitterness. >> no bitterness. >> you said his words and works will survive. when you look around the world today whether it is asia, the middle east, or africa, there is t
zone. >>> and right now, crowds are gathered outside nelson mandela's home in south africa. the country and the world are remembering him for his courage, his strength and his dignity. we're going live to south africa and we'll also speak with the former secretary of state, colin powell. >> the hello, i'm wolf blitzer in washington. big news for the u.s. economy today. hiring is up. unemployment is down. the jobs numbers for november were released this morning and they're much stronger than many analysts had been expecting. take a look. the economy added 203,000 jobs last month. that's 20,000 more than many of those economists had predicted. another surprise, the unemployment rate fell to 7% from the 7.3% a month earlier. that happens to be a five-year local and a real sign the economic recovery may be gaining some momentum. our christine romans is in new york watching all of these numbers for us. how significant are they, christine? >> it's significant, wolf. now you've got a trend in place for the year, you've got more than 2 million jobs on track to be created the best since 2005. it
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